Gallery blog


From Goya to Gliding – 6 months in the Marketing team

10 August 2015 by Celia Knight

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I’ve been the Gallery marketing and communications intern for the past 6 months, and what a six months it’s been!

With a background in History of Art, The Courtauld was the dream location to delve into the world of arts marketing and comms.

Walking through the Gallery before opening (having restocked the all-important leaflet holder) and enjoying a room full of Cézanne’s on the way to the office never gets old. The Courtauld really does have a stunning collection of paintings on the walls, and a great selection of rotating displays in the new Drawings Gallery. There is always something new to discover and I still haven’t settled on a favourite work!

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The location isn’t bad either. Situated in the North Block of Somerset House the Gallery finds itself surrounded by a thriving community of arts and cultural organisations as well as bars, brasseries and coffee shops. And fountains! I have loved sitting outside over lunch watching people race each other through the jets or pose in front of them for instagram-worthy shots and then get unintentionally soaked.

Back to the job – The role allows, and encourages, you to get involved in all aspects of marketing and communications within The Courtauld. From social media promotions, monthly e-newsletters and visitor research to feeding-back on poster designs, collating press packs and press coverage the department is a lively one with lots to get excited about.

Highlights for me include:

Assisting at the press call when the plaster cupid, brought from Cézanne’s studio in the south of France, was re-united with its ‘portrait’.

Photographing and working on the Illuminating Objects series – seeing Elly’s aventurine bowl project through from inception to display. Trips to the stores and conservation studios are always fascinating and remind you that there is always more to learn about the collection.

The Gallery team.  There are lots of friendly faces in the building which forms a great collaborative atmosphere. Everyone has been hugely welcoming and supportive and I’m very grateful for all that I’ve learnt.

In the last 6 months I have seen the extraordinary exhibition Goya: The Witches and Old Women Album open to excellent reviews and the Goya Late events attract record numbers. Unfinished…Works from The Courtauld Gallery seemed a long way off in February but time sped along and now it’s only next month that the Bridget Riley: Learning from Seurat display is installed, followed by Soaring Flight: Peter Lanyon’s Gliding Paintings!

I couldn’t have asked for a better introduction into the world of arts marketing and communications. I’ve learnt so much from the whole team, and in particular from Emily Butcher my manager – thank you. I have been lucky enough to secure a full-time job within marketing and communications, no doubt in part due to my time at The Courtauld.

I look forward to returning to the Gallery to see the displays and projects that I have been working on come to fruition. Until then, nothing beats seeing reviews of the shows you’ve been involved with or your leaflets or posters out on display!

 

Categories: Collection, Displays, Goya: The Witches and Old Women Album | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment


Auerbach’s Back!

3 August 2015 by Emily

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Back in March we announced the news that two major works by Frank Auerback have joined The Gallery’s permanent collection – Rebuilding the Empire Cinema, Leicester Square, 1962, and Summer, Tretire, 1975.

 

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These works came from the private collection of Auerbach’s close friend, the late Lucian Freud and have been allocated to The Courtauld Gallery by HM Government Acceptance in Lieu Scheme, which is administered by Arts Council England.

 

The works will be in room 13 from this week as part of our British modern display alongside works from Lucian Freud, Walter Sickert and David Bomberg as well as: Leon Kossoff, Christ Church, Spitalfields, Early Summer and Frank Auerbach Head of Leon Kossoff which are new loans to the gallery.

 

Book your ticket now

Categories: Collection, Displays, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment


The Bloomsbury Boom

30 July 2015 by Celia Knight

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As our 20th century British rooms are re-hung and Life in Squares hits our screens the Bloomsbury Group seems to be on everyone’s lips!

Visit the Gallery to see Vanessa Bell’s A Conversation with its original frame, painted by the artist alongside works by Duncan Grant, Roger Fry and others.

Vanessa Bell - A Conversation
You may not know that The Courtauld also holds the largest collection of surviving working drawings of the Omega Workshops, bequeathed to the Gallery by Fry’s daughter Pamela Diamand in 1958.

Established in 1913 by Roger Fry, the Omega Workshops were an experimental design collective.

Omega

Well ahead of their time, the Omega Workshops brought the experimental language of avant-garde art to domestic design in Edwardian Britain. They were a laboratory of design ideas, creating a range of objects for the home, from rugs and linens to ceramics, furniture and clothing – all boldly coloured with dynamic abstract patterns. No artist was allowed to sign their work, and everything produced by the Workshops bore only the Greek letter Ω (Omega).

Inspired by their works our Gallery shop has developed a beautiful range of gifts both in-store and online.

From jewellery to scarves, prints to rugs and even award-winning wallpaper you can enjoy the striking bold prints of the Omega Workshops wherever you are.

Bloomsbury shop products

Visit our shop at:
Somerset House
Strand
London
WC2R 0RN

Or shop online: courtauldshop.com

 

BLOOMSBURY COMPETITION

We have a copy of The Bloomsbury Cookbook: Recipes for Life, Love and Art to give away, with two complimentary tickets to the Gallery.

This beautiful volume published by Thames and Hudson is packed full of illustrations, quotations and nearly 300 recipes.

The Bloomsbury Cookbook

In July 1913 the Omega Workshops opened to the public. To win, tell us –

What was the London address of the Omega Workshops?

Email your answer, full name and postal address to marketing@courtauld.ac.uk to enter!

Competition closes Thursday 20 August 2015, 10am.

Bloomsbury competition terms and conditions

Categories: Collection, Displays, Shop | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 comment


Finito! – Illuminating Objects

16 July 2015 by Celia Knight

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The Courtauld’s newest instalment is finally ready and has now been sitting proudly on display for over a week. The Venetian bowl (I have become accustomed to calling it ‘my’ bowl) is small but a lot of time, consideration and work from many people has gone into its display. From Sacha Gerstein’s curatorial eye to Graeme Barraclough’s experience as a conservator, Colin Lindley’s mount-making efforts and many more, the one tiny bowl had a lot of fantastic people working hard behind it, including my own research!

Elly and her bowl

I arrived bright and early on a beautiful sunny day at The Courtauld on the day of the installation. Due to works being carried out on the galleries lifts, the glass case had to be physically carried up the flight of stairs to its new home. However, this was luckily the last hurdle the project had to make before being completed.

Illuminating objects install

After some adjustments to the mount, and the application of new lettering and positioning of text labels, it was time for the bowl to be installed. The chalcedony glass that makes up the bowl has a fascinating quality of glowing bright red when a bright light is shone directly at it. Because of this, we wanted to get the lights in the case at just the right angle to produce some of this for visitors to see.

Another difficulty was how to angle the bowl. The inside of the bowl has a milky pale green colour, nowhere near as beautiful as the swirling patterns on the outside, which is much more interesting to look at, and relevant to the bowl’s history. This faced us with a small problem, because short of displaying the bowl upside down (in which case it would cease to look much like a bowl), one side of the cabinet was going to have a view of the inside of the bowl.

In a last-minute change (quite literally, just minutes before the glass hood was secured into place!) we decided to try turning the bowl round by 90 degrees. It sounds silly, but having the bowl side-on wasn’t something that had occurred to us! This way, both ‘viewing’ sides of the case, where the text panels are, get a brilliant view of the bowl’s exterior.

And with that, we ushered ourselves out of the gallery as the first members of the public arrived for the day.

The whole process of completing the Illuminating Objects internship has been eye-opening to a whole world I had never truly contemplated before. It has been hard work, but also fascinating, and immensely rewarding.

Thank you to everyone at The Courtauld (and beyond) who has given their time and assistance to this project. Special thanks to Sacha Gerstein for her guidance and expertise, and for giving me the opportunity to take part.

Categories: Displays, Illuminating Objects | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment


Installation: The Second Hand

17 June 2015 by Celia Knight

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With The Second Hand: Art Reworked Over Time opening this week we asked Coralie Malissard from our MA Curating the Art Museum course to tell us about how it’s been going….

Its hard, staring in front of this empty Word document to know where to start. How to express in a few words just how much of a roller coaster these last 10 days were for all of us? I personally haven’t had the time to ponder over these fast paced, jam-packed days spent basically living in the gallery space. I’m still jittering because of the amount of caffeine and sugar I’ve ingested to keep me going. My limbs are still tingling due to all the emotions I’ve been through. Although we had all been preparing The Second Hand: Reworked Art Over Time for the last six months – and had spent much time scrupulously planning this installation week – none of us could fully conceptualise just how much of a ‘journey’ installation would be.

It all started when a van rolled into Somerset House on Friday 5th with the temporary structure for our film booth. What was, customarily, an overly female environment was somewhat jolted by a team of contractors who were busy drilling, hammering and sanding away. The galleries were then revamped over the weekend by a team of expert decorators. What a reassuring feeling to see that the wall colour we had chosen from a colour chart had come out wonderfully! As part of the installation team, it was great to see this ballet of art handlers, conservators, technicians, electricians and decorators I had helped choreograph.

Gainsborough hanging

On Monday 8th we recorded podcasts to go up on the website. From Tuesday onwards, we experienced the sheer excitement of seeing the works in the flesh once they had carefully been removed from their protective crates and polyethylene wrappings. It was Christmas all over again! The works were then carefully condition checked with the help of a raking light, binocular headband magnifiers and the conservators’ expert knowledge.

Kate Edmondson explains condition reports and conservation

Looking back, I salute the team of art handlers who expertly got on with their job while 12 pair of eyes looked over their every move. We were like anxious mothers looking over their children… Talking of parental emotions, we were beaming with pride when our posters went up on the railings around Somerset House; when our project unfolds in the space harmoniously and when the vinyl for our introductory panel was successfully peeled onto the wall. For me, the cherry on the cake was seeing our exhibition come to life thanks to John Johnson’s expert lighting advice. Witnessing these finishing touches washed away the more stressful or tiresome moments, like when we went through each wall label and catalogue page with hawk-eyed scrutiny.

The Second Hand posters outside Somerset House

All in all, this was for me one of the most exciting and challenging projects I’ve worked on. There were some tense, stressful and teary moments, but the feeling of utter pure joy I got from working with incredible works of art made it all worth it. Even now, the works continue to unravel more meanings and surprises, more juxtapositions, correspondences and dialogues between themselves. And now, with the Private view just one day away, we can finally sit, back, relax and enjoy it.

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The Second Hand: Art Reworked Over Time is the collective, culminating project of the MA Curating the Art Museum course at the Courtauld Institute of Art. This year, the 12 students were challenged to respond to The Courtauld Gallery’s summer showcase Unfinished… Works from the Courtauld Gallery

The Second Hand: Art Reworked Over Time is at The Courtauld Gallery 18 June – 19 July 2015

Categories: Exhibitions, MA Curating | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

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